Publication


Publication list

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Dr. CHAN Wai Ling, Jenny Jenny Chan interviewed by Daniel Suen for AFP, in “Too Marxist for China? Radical Students Rattle Communist Leaders,” 23 November 2018.

The interview detail:
Jenny Chan interviewed by Daniel Suen for AFP, in “Too Marxist for China? Radical Students Rattle Communist Leaders,” 23 November 2018.

Pdf: 
5. Too Marxist for China Radical students rattle Communist leaders AFP
Dr. CHAN Wai Ling, Jenny Dr. Jenny Chan interviewed byTom Hancock, Yuan Yang, and Nian Liu for The Financial Times, in “Illegal Student Labour Fuels JD.com ‘Singles Day’ Sale,” 21 November 2018.
The interview: 
Interviewed by Tom Hancock, Yuan Yang, and Nian Liu for The Financial Times, in “Illegal Student Labour Fuels JD.com ‘Singles Day’ Sale,” 21 November 2018.

English version: Illegal student labour FT 21nov2018

Chinesse version: 京东“双十一”期间非法使用学生加班 FT中文网 21Nov2018
Dr. CHAN Wai Ling, Jenny Dr Jenny Chan interviewed by Ben Bland and Nicolle Liu for The Financial Times, in “China Factories Use Childcare Offer to Lure Migrant Workers,” 11 September 2018.
Dr. CHAN Wai Ling, Jenny Interviewed by Michelle Chen for The Nation, in “China’s Workers Aren’t Fighting a Trade War—They’re Fighting a Labor War,” 4 September 2018.
Dr. CHAN Wai Ling, Jenny Contribution to HKFP, Shenzhen Jasic Technology: the birth of a worker-student coalition in China? 1 Sep 2018


Dr. CHAN Wai Ling, Jenny Interviewed by James Lord for CKGSB Knowledge, in “Is China Pumping the Brakes on its Transition to a Services-Based Economy?,” 13 August 2018 (Cheung Kong Graduate School of Business).


The URL:
Interviewed by James Lord for CKGSB Knowledge, in “Is China Pumping the Brakes on its Transition to a Services-Based Economy?,” 13 August 2018 (Cheung Kong Graduate School of Business).

Download the pdf: 2018 CKGSB SUMMER 13 Aug business trends jobs in manufacturing and services sectors 

Dr. CHAN Wai Ling, Jenny Jenny Chan. 2018. “Economic Growth and Labor Security.” Pp. 166-88 in The SAGE Handbook of Contemporary China, 2 Volume Set, edited by Weiping Wu and Mark Frazier. London: SAGE.

Dr. CHAN Wai Ling, Jenny Jenny Chan. 2018. “The Collective Resistance of China’s Industrial Workers.” Pp. 107-25 in Global Perspectives on Workers’ and Labour Organisations, edited by Maurizio Atzeni and Immanuel Ness. Singapore: Springer.
Dr. CHAN Wai Ling, Jenny Jenny Chan. 2018. “#iSlaveat10.” Pp. 102-5 in Gilded Age: A Year of Chinese Labour, Civil Society, and Rights—Made in China Yearbook 2017, edited by Ivan Franceschini and Nicholas Loubere. Canberra, Australia: The Australian National University.

Dr. CHAN Wai Ling, Jenny Jenny Chan. 2018. “Class Inequalities and Social Struggles in China.” Global Dialogue: Magazine of the International Sociological Association, Vol. 8, Issue 1, pp. 48-49. April.

http://globaldialogue.isa-sociology.org/wp-content/uploads/2018/03/v8i1-english.pdf

*Available in Arabic, Bengali, Chinese, English, Farsi, French, Hindi, Indonesian, Japanese, Kazakh, Polish, Portuguese, Romanian, Russian, Spanish, Turkish.

Global Dialogue APRIL2018 Jenny Chan.
Dr. CHAN Wai Ling, Jenny Jenny Chan. 2018. “Assessing Working-Class Power in Postsocialist China.” Pp. 164-83 in On the Road to Global Labor History: A Festschrift for Marcel van der Linden, edited by Karl Heinz Roth. Leiden, the Netherlands: Koninklijke Brill NV.
Dr. CHAN Wai Ling, Jenny Jenny Chan and Mark Selden. 2017. “Apple and Foxconn in the Trump Era.” Pp. 118-22 in “China’s Goal: Hegemony or Global Partnership?” China’s World, Vol. 2, Issue 2, November. London: Huawen Institute. http://www.chinasworld.co.uk/ 
Dr. KU, Hok Bun Dominelli, Lena & Ku, Hok Bun (2017) “Green social work and its implications for social development in China,” China Journal of Social Work, Vol. 10, 1, 3-22.
 
Dr. KU, Hok Bun Glenzer , K., Aragón , A. O., Kassam , K. S., & Ku, Hok Bun (2017) Special Issue: Development, Aid, and Social Transformation. Action Research Journal, Vol. 15, No. 1, pp.1-128.
 
Dr. CHAN Wai Ling, Jenny Jenny Chan. 2017. “When the Foxbots Muscle In.” November. New Internationalist (UK), pp. 22-23.
Dr. CHAN Wai Ling, Jenny Jenny Chan. 2017. “#iSlaveat10.” Made in China: A Quarterly on Chinese Labour, Civil Society, and Rights. Volume 2, Issue 3, Chinese Labour in a Global Perspective, July-September, pp. 20-23.
Dr. CHAN Wai Ling, Jenny Jenny Chan, Mark Selden and Ngai Pun. 2017. “‘Growth, Thy Name is Suffering’: The Workers of the Workshop of the World.” World Factory: The Game, edited by Zoë Svendsen and Simon Daw. London: Nick Hern Books.
Dr. CHAN Wai Ling, Jenny Jenny Chan. 2017. Review of Jack Linchuan Qiu’s Goodbye iSlave: A Manifesto for Digital Abolition, Urbana-Champaign, IL: University of Illinois Press, 2016, vii+ 230 pp, ISBN 978-0-252-08212-2, doi:10.1017/S0305741017000728, The China Quarterly, 230, June, pp. 533-35.

Dr. CHAN Wai Ling, Jenny Jenny Chan. 2017. “The Apple Way to Make Products.” Pp. 87-91 in “Globalisation—The Downside?”, China’s World, Vol. 2, Issue 1, April. London: Huawen Institute (華聞學院).
Dr. CHAN Wai Ling, Jenny Jenny Chan. 2017. “Intern Labor in China.” Rural China: An International Journal of History and Social Science 14: 82-100.
 
Dr. CHAN Wai Ling, Jenny Jenny Chan and Mark Selden. 2017. “The Labour Politics of China’s Rural Migrant Workers.” Globalizations 14(2): 259-71.
 
Dr. CHAN Wai Ling, Jenny Ngai Pun, Yuan Shen, Yuhua Guo, Huilin Lu, Jenny Chan and Mark Selden. 2016. “Apple, Foxconn, and Chinese Workers’ Struggles from a Global Labor Perspective.” Inter-Asia Cultural Studies 17(2): 166-85.
 
Dr. CHAN Wai Ling, Jenny Jenny Chan, Ngai Pun and Mark Selden. 2015. “Interns or Workers? China’s Student Labor Regime.” Asian Studies (Official Journal of the Asian Studies Association of Hong Kong) 1(1): 69-98.
Dr. CHAN Wai Ling, Jenny Chris Smith and Jenny Chan. 2015. “Working for Two Bosses: Student Interns as Constrained Labour in China.” Human Relations 68(2): 305-26.
Dr. CHAN Wai Ling, Jenny Yang, Jenny Chan and Xu Lizhi. 2015. La machine est ton seigneur et ton maître (The Machine is Your Lord and Your Master). Translated in French by Celia Izoard. Cent mille signes. Éditions Agone. x, 110 pages. ISBN: 978-2-7489-0238-9
Dr. CHAN Wai Ling, Jenny Ngai Pun, Jenny Chan and Mark Selden. 2015. Morire per un iPhone (Dying for an iPhone). Translated in Italian by Ferruccio Gambino and Giorgio Grappi; edited by Ferruccio Gambino and Devi Sacchetto. Milan: Jaca Books. 269 pages. ISBN: 978-88-16-41246-
 
Dr. CHAN Wai Ling, Jenny Ngai Pun, Yuan Shen, Yuhua Guo, Huilin Lu, Jenny Chan and Mark Selden. 2014. “Worker-Intellectual Unity: Trans-Border Sociological Intervention in Foxconn.” Current Sociology 62(2): 209-22.
 
Dr. CHAN Wai Ling, Jenny Jenny Chan and Mark Selden. 2014. “China’s Rural Migrant Workers, the State, and Labor Politics.” Critical Asian Studies 46(4): 599-620.
Dr. CHAN Wai Ling, Jenny Ngai Pun, Jenny Chan and Mark Selden. 2014. Morir por un iPhone (Dying for an iPhone). Translated in Spanish by Florencia Olivera; edited by Andrés Ruggeri. Ciudad Autónoma de Buenos Aires, Argentina: Ediciones Continente S.R.L. 220 pages. ISBN: 978-950-754-501-6
Dr. CHAN Wai Ling, Jenny Jenny Chan. 2013. “A Suicide Survivor: The Life of a Chinese Worker.” New Technology, Work and Employment 28(2): 84-99.
Dr. CHAN Wai Ling, Jenny Jenny Chan, Ngai Pun and Mark Selden. 2013. “The Politics of Global Production: Apple, Foxconn and China’s New Working Class.” New Technology, Work and Employment 28(2): 100-15.
Dr. CHAN Wai Ling, Jenny Ngai Pun and Jenny Chan. 2013. “The Spatial Politics of Labor in China: Life, Labor, and a New Generation of Migrant Workers.” The South Atlantic Quarterly 112(1): 179-90.
Dr. CHAN Wai Ling, Jenny Ngai Pun and Jenny Chan. 2012. “Global Capital, the State, and Chinese Workers: The Foxconn Experience.” Modern China 38(4): 383-410.
 
Dr. CHAN Wai Ling, Jenny Jenny Chan and Ngai Pun. 2010. “Suicide as Protest for the New Generation of Chinese Migrant Workers.” The Asia-Pacific Journal, Vol. 8, Iss. 37, No. 2.
 
Dr. CHAN Wai Ling, Jenny Ngai Pun, Chris King-Chi Chan, and Jenny Chan. 2010. “The Role of the State, Labor Policy and Migrant Workers’ Struggles in Globalized China.” Global Labor Journal 1(1): 132-51.

Dr. CHAN Wai Ling, Jenny Jenny Chan. 2009. “Meaningful Progress or Illusory Reform? Analyzing China’s Labor Contract Law.” New Labor Forum: A Journal of Ideas, Analysis and Debates 18(2): 43-51.

Dr. KU, Hok Bun SHERRADEN, Michael, Zou, Li, Ku, Hok Bun, Deng, Suo & Wang, Sibin (2015) Asset-Building Policies and Innovations in Asia. London: Routledge.
 
Dr. KU, Hok Bun Pun, Ngai, Ku, Hok Bun, Yang, Hairong & Koo, Anita (2015) Social Economy in China and the World. London: Routledge
 
Dr. SIM, Boon Wee Timothy Sim, T. (2013). Resilient children: A Chinese post-disaster psychosocial work model. Social Dialogue, September issue, 76-79.


Dr. SIM, Boon Wee Timothy Sim, T., Yuen, W.K.A., Chen, H.Q., Qi, H. D. (2013). Rising to the occasion: China disaster social work. International Social Work, 56(4), 544-562.


Dr. SIM, Boon Wee Timothy Sim, T. (2011). Developing an expanded school mental health network in a post-earthquake Chinese context. Journal of Social Work. 11(3), 326-330.


Dr. IP, Fu Keung David Subramanian, S.V., and Ip, D. (2013) “Water Policies are Never Implemented, but Negotiated:” Analzying Integration of Policies Using a Bayesian Network. In Prakash, A., Singh, S., Goodrich, C.G., and Janakarajan, S. (Eds.), Water Resources Policies in South Asia. Pp. 66-98. London, New York, New Delhi: Routledge.


Dr. IP, Fu Keung David Ip, D. (2011) Simultaneity and Liminality: Identity anxieties of 1.5 generation Chinese migrants in Australia. In Ip, M. (Ed.), Transmigration and the New Chinese: Theories and Practices from the New Zealand Experiences. Pp. 163-182. Hong Kong: Centre of Asian Studies, the University of Hong Kong.


Dr. IP, Fu Keung David Ip, D. (2011) Simultaneity and Liminality: Identity anxieties of 1.5 generation Chinese migrants in Australia. In Ip, M. (Ed.), Transmigration and the New Chinese: Theories and Practices from the New Zealand Experiences. Pp. 163-182. Hong Kong: Centre of Asian Studies, the University of Hong Kong.


Dr. IP, Fu Keung David Chambers, S.K., Hyde, M.K., Ip, D.F-K., Dunn, J.C. and Gardiner, R.A. (2013) “Systematic Review of Research into the Psychological Aspects of Prostate Cancer in Asia: What do we Know?” Asian Pacific Journal of Cancer Prevention, 14(4): 2621-2626.


Dr. IP, Fu Keung David Chambers, S.K., Hyde, M.K., Au, A.M.L., Ip, D., Shum, D., and Dunn, J. (2013) “A systematic review of psycho-oncology research in Chinese populations: Emerging trends”, European Journal of Cancer Care, July. DOI: 10.1111/ecc.12087.


Dr. IP, Fu Keung David Li, B-H., Wang, L-R., and Ip, D. F-K. (2011) “Global Financial Crisis and Job Satisfaction of Atypical Workers: the Case of Taiwan”. Journal of Asian Public Policy, 4(1): 103-120.


Dr. KU, Hok Bun Ku, Hok Bun (2012) “Eco-tourism and the Practice of Alternative Social Economy”, Open Time, Vol.2. pp. 8-11.


Dr. KU, Hok Bun Pun, Ngai & Ku, Hok Bun (2011) "China at the Crossroads: Social Economy as the new way of Development". China Journal of Social Work, Vol. 4, No. 3, pp.197-201.


Prof. PUN, Ngai Kennett, P., Chan, K.W., Chung, K.W., Pun, N. and Ngan, L.LS. (2013). “Governance and Citizenship in East Asia: Beijing, Hong Kong, Taipei, and Seoul.” 1st Ed. Centre for Social Policy Studies, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hong Kong, 153pp


Prof. PUN, Ngai Pun, Ngai (2012). “Made in China: Vivre avec les ouvrières chinoises (French Version).” 1st Ed. Éditions de l'Aube, France, 285pp


Prof. PUN, Ngai Pun, N and Chen, J. (2013), “The Spatial Politics of Labor in China: Life, Labor, and a New Generation of Migrant Workers”, The South Atlantic Quarterly 112:1, pp.179-190.


Prof. PUN, Ngai Pun, Ngai (2012). “Global Capital, the State and Chinese Workers: The Foxconn Experience”. MODERN CHINA, Vol. 38, No. 4, pp.383-410


Prof. PUN, Ngai Pun, Ngai (2012), “Gender and Class: Women’s Working Lives in a Dormitory Labor Regime in China”, International Labor and Working-Class History, No. 81, Spring 2012, pp. 178–181.


Prof. PUN, Ngai Pun, Ngai (2012), “The Spatial Politics of Labor in China: Life, Labor, and a New Generation of Migrant Workers”, The South Atlantic Quarterly, Vol. 38, No. 4, pp.383-410


Untitled Sherraden, M., Zhou, L., Deng, S., Ku, Hok Bun (2013) Special Issue: Lifelong Assest Building. China Journal of Social Work, London: Routledge.
 
Dr. IP, Fu Keung David Ku, Hok Bun, David Ip & Jacky Xiong Yue-gen (2009) ‘Special Issue: Disaster Relief and Social Work in China’ China Journal of Social Work, vol. 2, no. 3


Dr. KU, Hok Bun Ku, Hok Bun (2011) “Happiness being like a blooming flower’: an action research of rural social work in an ethnic minority community of Yunnan Province, PRC,” Action Research, (published online first 10 May 2011).

The effects of rural reform and China’s integration into the global capitalist market have increased the vulnerability of the rural poor to financial hardship, loss of cultural identity, and other deprivations. In response to this situation, we initiated a pilot action research project in 2005 in an ethnic minority community in the Yunnan province of China. It encouraged local women to form a handicraft group to preserve and develop indigenous cultural artefacts and crafts which are available for market consumption. It aims, through capacity building, enhance the women’s income, promote a new form of collectivism, protect the Zhuang ethnic minority traditional culture, and strengthen local cultural identity and confidence. This article first describes the dilemma of China’s rural development and introduces our theoretical perspective. Then it demonstrates how we invigorated the community participation and facilitated the rural social work step by step.
Dr. KU, Hok Bun Ku, Hok Bun (2011) “Lo sviluppo delle competenze nel tirocinio come pratica educativa riflessiva: un esempio di educazione dell’assistente sociale in Cina” (Capacity Building in Practicum as Educational Reflective Practice: an Example of Social Work Education in China ). Educational Reflective Practices Journal. Summer, No.1, pp. 60-75. (in Italian)


Dr. KU, Hok Bun Ku, Hok Bun (2011) “Gendered suffering: married Miao women’s narratives on domestic violence in southwest China,” China Journal of Social Work. Vol. 4, No. 1, pp. 23-39.

This paper is based on our oral testimonial projects in Guizhou province in Southwest China. Since 1999, we have employed oral testimony as one of the community development strategies and methods to study the life histories of Miao ethnic minority women in China's impoverished rural regions. By employing this method, we aim to empower the marginalized Miao women, and help them explore their hidden voices and learn about their life experiences, their views on their relationship with their husbands, families, communities, and other social forces that shape their livelihoods. Local women's narratives, especially those of married women, demonstrated their eagerness to talk about their lives as well as their suffering from family burdens, family discord, domestic violence, alcoholism, and other issues which were beyond our agenda. We finally found that suffering is the collective experience of married women, and domestic violence is a major source of women's suffering. This paper seeks to examine how the patriarchal system, rural poverty, and traditional cultural practices intertwine in shaping women's lives and contribute to women's suffering in everyday life.
Dr. KU, Hok Bun Ku, Hok Bun, David Ip & Jacky Xiong Yue-gen (2009) ‘Special Issue: Disaster Relief and Social Work in China’ China Journal of Social Work, vol. 2, no. 3



Dr. KU, Hok Bun Pei, Yu-xin, Zhang, He-qing & Ku, Hok Bun (2009) “Guangzhou social workers in Yingxiu: a case study of social work intervention in the aftermath of the Sichuan 5.12 earthquake in China” China Journal of Social Work. Vol. 2., Issue 3, p. 151-163.

The most devastating effects of the Sichuan 5.12 earthquake occurred in Yingxiu, where Guangzhou social workers were sent to deal with the aftermath. In this paper, we describe our experience working in the post-earthquake community and the theoretical approach we adopted to realize our objectives. We also outline the challenges and opportunities of the social work profession in the field of disaster management. We argue that social workers in China should adopt a holistic approach to disaster intervention and act as promoters of psychological well-being in the community, needs appraisers, capacity builders, and social resource mediators.
Dr. KU, Hok Bun Ku, Hok Bun, Yuen-Tsang, Angelina W. K., Liu, H. C. (2009) “Triple Capacity Building as Critical Pedagogy A Rural Social Work Practicum in China” Journal of Transformative Education. Vol. 7, No. 2, pp. 146-163.

This article contains our reflections on the experience of using a triple capacity building (TCB) model to train students in community development work in rural China. The TCB approach subscribes to critical pedagogy, which calls for a reinvention of the self by challenging the traditional model of education and by transforming institutionalized students into reflexive subjects with critical curiosity about society, power, inequality, and social change. By advocating equal participation in rural social work practices and by using the approach of dialogical education, the authors encouraged the participating students to embody this critical subjectivity.
Prof. PUN, Ngai Pun, Ngai and Yuen-Tsang Woon-ki Angelina (2011), “The challenges of corporate social responsibility (CSR) multi-stakeholder practices: searching for a new occupational social work model in China”, China Journal of Social Work. Vol. 4, No. 1, April 2011, 57–68

The emergence of China as a ‘world's factory’ in the new millennium was accompanied by the rise of a new working class which was composed of more than 200 million peasant-workers. As internal migrant labourers, these peasant-workers were deprived of citizenship rights to reside in the city and lacked basic labour rights and protections. In order to address the precarious working conditions of migrant workers who were employed by transnational corporations, a global Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) movement emerged, introducing a wide range of transnational corporate codes of conduct, labour standards and labour rights. This article presents a case study of a transnational CSR multi-stakeholder training programme at a Chinese workplace, in an attempt to demonstrate how capital, transnational NGOs and local labour NGOs – and including social workers – are all involved in the project to promote labour rights in China. Specific focus is placed on the role of social workers in enhancing worker participation in this project; the challenges and dilemmas that they encountered in the process, and suggestions are provided regarding the future development of a new model of occupational social work in China.
Prof. PUN, Ngai Pun, Ngai and Lu, Huilin, (2010),“Unfinished Proletarianization: Self, Anger and Class Action of the Second Generation of Peasant-Workers in Reform China”, Modern China, 36(5):493-519.

As a result of its open-door policies and 30 years of reform, China has become the “world’s factory” and given rise to a new working class of rural migrant workers. This process has underlain a path of (semi-)proletarianization of Chinese peasant-workers: now the second generation is experiencing dagong, working for a boss, in industrialized towns and cities. What is the process of proletarianization of peasant-workers in China today? In what way does the path of proletarianization shape the new Chinese working class? Drawing on workers’ narratives and our ethnographic studies in Shenzhen and Dongguan between 2005 and 2008, this study focuses on the subjective experiences of the second generation of dagongmei/zai, female migrant workers/male migrant workers, who have developed new forms of power and resistance unknown to the previous generation of workers. Did the pain and trauma experienced by the first generation of dagong subjects gradually evolve into the anger and resentment that has conditioned the labor strikes and class actions of the second generation? In short, what continuity and change can we observe in the life struggles of this new working class? Is the second generation of dagong subjects compelled to take action as a result of long-endured pain and anger? Self, anger, and collective action among the new working class propel the narrative described in this article.
Prof. PUN, Ngai Pun, Ngai and Lu, Huilin (2010), “A Culture of Violence: The Labor Subcontracting System and Collective Actions by Construction Workers in Post-Socialist China”, The China Journal. No. 64, pp.143-158.

The article presents the results of research into the lives of construction workers in China. It focuses on the daily practices and culture of violence associated with migrant construction workers involved in the labor subcontracting system. Interviews with more than 200 workers were conducted at four construction sites near Beijing, China, and in a village in Tang County, Hebei, where approximately a quarter of the working adults were construction workers. It is argued that the politics of labor resistance are a significant contributing factor to industry violence.
Prof. PUN, Ngai Pun, Ngai and Lu Huilin (2010), “Neoliberalism, Urbanism and the Plight of Construction Workers in China”, Review in World Political Economy. Vol1, No1, pp127-142.

Thirty years after China's Reform and Opening, China has become not only the world's workshop, but also the world's largest construction site. In large and small construction sites throughout the country, 40 million "peasant workers" are building world-class metropolises such as Beijing and Shanghai, creating China's economic miracle of rapid growth, and making many Chinese people euphoric about "the rise of a powerful state" (daguo jueqi). From the perspective of Marxist and post-Marxist theory, we try to understand these "peasant workers" in the process of working-class formation and China's overall social transformation. Through this study, we reflect on the question of neoliberalism, urbanism and the formation of a new working class in China.

Prof. PUN, Ngai Pun, Ngai, Chris Chan and Jenny Chan (2010) “The Role of the State, Labour Policy and Migrant Workers’ Struggles in Globalized China”, Global Labor Journal, Vol.1, Issue 1, pp132-151.


Prof. PUN, Ngai Chris King-chi Chan and Pun, Ngai (2009), “The Making of a New Working Class? A Study of Collective Actions of Migrant Workers in South China”, The China Quarterly. Issue 198, June 2009, pp. 287-303.

In this study, we argue that the specific process of the proletarianization of Chinese migrant workers contributes to the recent rise of labour protests. Most of the collective actions involve workers' conflict with management at the point of production, while simultaneously entailing labour organizing in dormitories and communities. The type of living space, including workers' dormitories and migrant communities, facilitates collective actions organized not only on bases of locality, ethnicity, gender and peer alliance in a single workplace, but also on attempts to nurture workers' solidarity in a broader sense of a labour oppositional force moving beyond exclusive networks and ties, sometimes even involving cross-factory strike tactics. These collective actions are mostly interest-based, accompanied by a strong anti-foreign capital sentiment and a discourse of workers' rights. By providing detailed cases of workers' strikes in 2004 and 2007, we suggest that the making of a new working class is increasingly conscious of and participating in interest-based or class-oriented labour protests.
Prof. PUN, Ngai Pun, Ngai (2009) Chinese Migrant Women Workers in a Dormitory Labour System. Asia Insights. No. 1, June, pp9-13.


Prof. PUN, Ngai Leung, Pak Nang and Pun, Ngai (2009), “The Radicalization of the New Working Class: The Collective Actions of Migrant Workers in South China”, The Third World Quarterly.

The repositioning of China as a ' world workshop' rests upon the nurturing of a new Chinese working class. This article focuses on questions of collective action of migrant workers who are now the major force of a new working class that actively strives to alter its fate through labour struggles. By studying the collective actions of migrant workers in the gemstone industry, we examine a process in which workers' resistance has developed from a single means to multiple means, from single-factory to cross-factory participation, from engaging only in legal action to launching varied collective action. Three primary questions are raised: first, what forms of collective labour action have arisen and what are their mechanisms of mobilisation? Second, how do shop-floor industrial relationships, legal systems and other institutional arrangements shape such collective resistance? Third, how do workers nurture class consciousness through their participation in collective action and, most importantly, how do they make sense of their struggle through a radicalisation process?
Dr. SIM, Boon Wee Timothy Qi, H. D., & Sim, T. [2011]. Needs assessment of post-earthquake student amputees. China Theory Research, 593, 43-46. [In Chinese: 齐华栋, 沈文伟 [In press]. 5·12地震后伤残学生的需求分析. 学理论, 593, 43-46.

Dr. SIM, Boon Wee Timothy Sim, T. (2011). Developing an expanded school mental health network in a post-earthquake Chinese context. Journal of Social Work. 11(3), 326-330.

This article reports on a school mental health project, developed in the context of post-Sichuan earthquake recovery and reconstruction
Dr. SIM, Boon Wee Timothy Sim, T. (2009). Crossing the river stone by stone: developing an expanded school mental health network in post-quake Sichuan. China Journal of Social Work, 2(3), 165–177.

This paper chronicles and consolidates my personal experience and professional journey in China in the past one year after the 512 Sichuan earthquake erupted on 12 May 2008.Several summer children projects I helped to organize had evolved into an expanded school mental health network. As I critically reflect on the pertinent issues in developing professional school social work practice in Sichuan, I shall also outline the challenges and opportunities of relief work in China's context, drawing from the systems perspective. Maximizing available local resources and facilitating the natural development of support network seems to be a useful approach in disaster recovery work. Furthermore, the need for professionals, especially outsiders, to be respectful and be culturally sensitive is valuable.
Dr. SIM, Boon Wee Timothy Zhu, Y. X., & Sim, T. (2009). Working with children in Sichuan earthquake using the “person-in-environment” perspective. Journal of Social Work, 9(2), 31-34. [In Chinese: 朱雨欣.沈文伟.灾后儿童心理重建路径探析.社会工作, 2009年9月下半月, 31-34页.]


Prof. YUEN-Tsang, Woon Ki Angelina Pun Ngai and Yuen-Tsang Woon-ki Angelina (2011), “The challenges of corporate social responsibility (CSR) multi-stakeholder practices: searching for a new occupational social work model in China”, China Journal of Social Work. Vol. 4, No. 1, April 2011, 57–68
The emergence of China as a ‘world's factory’ in the new millennium was accompanied by the rise of a new working class which was composed of more than 200 million peasant-workers. As internal migrant labourers, these peasant-workers were deprived of citizenship rights to reside in the city and lacked basic labour rights and protections. In order to address the precarious working conditions of migrant workers who were employed by transnational corporations, a global Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) movement emerged, introducing a wide range of transnational corporate codes of conduct, labour standards and labour rights. This article presents a case study of a transnational CSR multi-stakeholder training programme at a Chinese workplace, in an attempt to demonstrate how capital, transnational NGOs and local labour NGOs – and including social workers – are all involved in the project to promote labour rights in China. Specific focus is placed on the role of social workers in enhancing worker participation in this project; the challenges and dilemmas that they encountered in the process, and suggestions are provided regarding the future development of a new model of occupational social work in China.
Prof. YUEN-Tsang, Woon Ki Angelina Ku, Hok Bun, Yuen-Tsang, Angelina W. K., Liu, H. C. (2009) “Triple Capacity Building as Critical Pedagogy A Rural Social Work Practicum in China” Journal of Transformative Education. Vol. 7, No. 2, pp. 146-163.
This article contains our reflections on the experience of using a triple capacity building (TCB) model to train students in community development work in rural China. The TCB approach subscribes to critical pedagogy, which calls for a reinvention of the self by challenging the traditional model of education and by transforming institutionalized students into reflexive subjects with critical curiosity about society, power, inequality, and social change. By advocating equal participation in rural social work practices and by using the approach of dialogical education, the authors encouraged the participating students to embody this critical subjectivity.